Colloquia and Seminars

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Computer Science events calendar in HTTP ICS format for of Google calendars, and for Outlook.

Academic Calendar at Technion site.

Upcoming Colloquia & Seminars

  • Pixel Club: OATM: Occlusion Aware Template Matching by Consensus Set Maximization

    Speaker:
    Simon Korman (Weizmann Institute of Science)
    Date:
    Tuesday, 22.5.2018, 11:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.

    We present a novel approach to template matching that is efficient, can handle partial occlusions, and comes with provable performance guarantees. A key component of the method is a reduction that transforms the problem of searching a nearest neighbor among N high-dimensional vectors, to searching neighbors among two sets of order sqrt{N} vectors, which can be found efficiently using range search techniques. This allows for a quadratic improvement in search complexity, and makes the method scalable in handling large search spaces. The second contribution is a hashing scheme based on consensus set maximization, which allows us to handle occlusions. The resulting scheme can be seen as a randomized hypothesize-and-test algorithm, which is equipped with guarantees regarding the number of iterations required for obtaining an optimal solution with high probability. The predicted matching rates are validated empirically and the algorithm shows a significant improvement over the state-of-the-art in both speed and robustness to occlusions.

  • Pixel Club: Numerical Methods in Visual Computing: what we can learn from each other

    Speaker:
    Uri Ascher (UBC)
    Date:
    Wednesday, 23.5.2018, 11:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.

    Visual computing is a wide area that includes computer graphics and image processing, where the "eyeball-norm" rules. I will briefly discuss two case studies involving numerical methods and analysis applied to this area. The first case study involves motion simulation and calibration of soft objects such as plants, skin, and cloth. The governing elastodynamics PDE system, discretized in space already at the variational level using co-rotated FEM, leads to a large, expensive to assemble, dynamical system in time, where the damped motion may mask highly oscillatory stiffness. An exponential differencing method will be described, in search for more quantitative computations. The second case study involves some image processing problems where there is a premium for local approaches that do not necessarily use underlying PDEs. I will demonstrate and discuss.

  • ceClub: RISC-V - Why a new CPU Architecture?

    Speaker:
    Oded Lempel (Mellanox Technologies)
    Date:
    Wednesday, 23.5.2018, 11:30
    Place:
    EE Meyer Building 861

    Who needs a new Instruction Set Architecture (ISA)? Architectures have reached some unspoken Truce through Markets Segment dominance (IA64 - PC and Server market, ARM - Mobile market). IA and ARM have ruled the PC/Server and Mobile markets, respectively, for years and have prevailed aggressive competitive assaults Some Markets are still pursuing a standard (ARM and Various DSPs - IoT market, GPGPU (Nvidia) and TPU (Google) - IA/ML applications) IoT and IA/ML segments have not yet matured and no standard has been established. They are attracting a lot of innovation that may yield a dominant standard architecture. Where is there room for a new ISA? What would lead the industry and market to move to a new market? We will focus on RISC-V, what it brings that is not available in existing Architectures, in which markets is this enough to create an Architecture change.

  • Theory Seminar: Approximate Modularity Revisited

    Speaker:
    Inbal Talgam-Cohen (CS, Technion)
    Date:
    Wednesday, 23.5.2018, 12:30
    Place:
    Taub 201

    Set functions with convenient properties (such as submodularity) often arise in algorithmic game theory, and allow for improved properties of optimization algorithms and mechanisms. It is natural to ask (e.g., in the context of data driven applications) how robust such properties are, and whether small deviations from them can be tolerated. We consider two such questions in the important special case of linear set functions. One question that we address is whether any set function that approximately satisfies the modularity equation (linear functions satisfy the modularity equation exactly) is close to a linear function. The answer to this is positive (in a precise formal sense) as shown by Kalton and Roberts [1983] (and further improved by Bondarenko, Prymak, and Radchenko [2013]). We revisit their proof idea that is based on expander graphs, and provide significantly stronger upper bounds by combining it with new techniques. Furthermore, we provide improved lower bounds for this problem. Another question that we address is that of how to learn a linear function $h$ that is close to an approximately linear function $f$, while querying the value of $f$ on only a small number of sets. Joint work with Uriel Feige and Michal Feldman.

  • CGGC Seminar: Integer-Only Cross Field Computation

    Speaker:
    Nahum Farchi (CS, Technion)
    Date:
    Sunday, 27.5.2018, 13:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.

    We propose a new iterative algorithm for computing smooth cross fields on triangle meshes that is simple, easily parallelizable on the GPU and finds solutions with lower energy and fewer cone singularities than state-of-the-art methods.

    Our approach is based on a formal equivalence, which we prove, between two formulations of the optimization problem. This equivalence allows us to eliminate the real variables and design an efficient grid search algorithm for the cone singularities. We leverage a recent graph-theoretical approximation of the resistance distance matrix of the triangle mesh to speed up the computation and enable a trade-off between the computation time and the smoothness of the output.

  • CSpecial Talk: How to Manage Negotiation on Employment Contract

    CSpecial Talk: How to Manage Negotiation on Employment Contract

    Speaker:
    Sarah Karu (Talent management specialist)
    Date:
    Monday, 28.5.2018, 17:00
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.

    We are happy to invite your to the sixth of series of meetings on career and job seeking which will be held at CS, on Monay, May 28, at 17:00, in room 337, CS Taub Building.

    Sarah Karu (Talent management specialist) will give a talk on "How to manage negotiation on employment contract".

    Please pre-register.

    See you there!

  • Accelerating Innovation Through Analogy Mining

    Speaker:
    Dafna Shahaf - COLLOQUIUM LECTURE
    Date:
    Tuesday, 29.5.2018, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Computer Science, Hebrew University
    Host:
    Yuval Filmus

    The availability of large idea repositories (e.g., the U.S. patent database) could significantly accelerate innovation and discovery by providing people with inspiration from solutions to analogous problems. However, finding useful analogies in these large, messy, real-world repositories remains a persistent challenge for either human or automated methods. In this work we explore the viability and value of learning simpler structural representations which specify the purpose of a product and the mechanisms by which it achieves that purpose. Our approach combines crowdsourcing and recurrent neural networks to extract purpose and mechanism vector representations from product descriptions. We demonstrate that these learned vectors allow us to find analogies with higher precision and recall than traditional information-retrieval methods. In an ideation experiment, analogies retrieved by our models significantly increased people's likelihood of generating creative ideas. Bio: Dafna Shahaf is an Assistant Professor in the School of Computer Science and Engineering at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her research is about making sense of massive amounts of data. She designs algorithms that help people connect the dots between pieces of information and turn data into insight. She is especially interested in unlocking the potential of the many digital traces left by human activity to understand and emulate human characteristics (e.g., creativity). Her work has received multiple awards, including Best Research Paper at KDD'17 and KDD’10 and the IJCAI Early Career Award. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University. Prior to joining the Hebrew University, she was a postdoctoral fellow at Microsoft Research and Stanford University.

  • Qubit 2018 - Quantum Communication: Celebrating Bennett & Brassard's Wolf Prize for Physics

    Qubit 2018 - Quantum Communication: Celebrating Bennett & Brassard's Wolf Prize for Physics

    Date:
    Sunday, 3.6.2018, 09:30
    Place:
    CS Taub Building

    The Technion Hiroshi Fujiwara Cyber Security Research Center is happy to invite you to save the date for the Qubit 2018 - Quantum Communication: Celebrating Bennett & Brassard's Wolf Prize for Physics conference to be held on Sunday, June 3rd, 2018 at the Taub CS Building, Technion.

    Chairs:
    Eli Biham, Technion
    Tal Mor, Technion

    Confirmed Speakers will be:
    Keynote: Charles Bennett, IBM Research Center:
    "Why DIY Randomness is Better Than DI Randomness"

    Keynote: Gilles Brassard, Université de Montréal:
    "Cryptography In A Quantum World"

     Lev Vaidman, Tel-Aviv University:
    "Counterfactual Communication"

    Tal Mor, Technion:
    "Quantum Computers - Is The Future Here?"

    Participating is free but requires pre-registration.

    More details and full program.

  • Matching Visual Data

    Speaker:
    Shai Avidan - COLLOQUIUM LECTURE
    Date:
    Tuesday, 5.6.2018, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Faculty of Engineering, Tel-Aviv University
    Host:
    Yuval Filmus
  • Privacy, and Why You Should Care

    Speaker:
    Katrina Ligett - COLLOQUIUM LECTURE
    Date:
    Tuesday, 12.6.2018, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Hebrew University
    Host:
    Yuval Filmus

    Over the past decade, the computer science research community has converged around a formal notion of data privacy, known as differential privacy, and has made substantial progress in establishing the theoretical foundations of this notion. In this talk, I will give a brief overview of differential privacy and the relevant mathematical toolkit, and then we will discuss the implications and frontiers of this research space. Can differential privacy ever be practical? How might it be useful, even in settings where we don't care about privacy? What's next for privacy? Brief bio: Katrina Ligett is an Associate Professor in the School of Computer Science and Engineering at Hebrew University. Before joining Hebrew University, she was faculty in computer science and economics at Caltech. Katrina’s primary research interests are in data privacy and algorithmic game theory. She received her PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 2009 and did her postdoc at Cornell University. She is a recipient of the NSF CAREER award and a Microsoft Faculty Fellowship.

  • The 8th Annual International TCE Conference on Deep Learning: Theory & Practice

    The 8th Annual International TCE Conference on Deep Learning: Theory & Practice

    Date:
    Thursday, 14.6.2018, 08:30
    Place:
    EE, Meyer 280

    The 8th annual international TCE conference on Deep Learning: Theory & Practice will take place on Thursday, June 14, 2018 at the Technion Electrical Engneering Department, Meyer 280, and will focus on why is it working so well, and how can we improve it in various domains, such as vision, language, and audio.

    Conference Chairs: Daniel Soudry (EE Technion) and Ran El-Yaniv (CS Technion)

    Confirmed Speakers list includes:

    · Lior Wolf, Tel Aviv University, Israel
    · Michal Irani, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel
    · Nathan Srebro, Taub Distinguished Visitor, Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago, USA
    · Uri Shalit, Technion, Israel
    · Yoav Goldberg, Bar Ilan University, Israel
    · Zachary Chase Lipton, Taub Distinguished Visitor, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

    More details, program, registration, and information on TCE.

  • CS RESEARCH DAY 2018

    CS RESEARCH DAY 2018

    Date:
    Monday, 18.6.2018, 15:00
    Place:
    CS Taub Lobby

    The 8th CS Research Day for graduate studies will be held on Monday, June 18, 2018 between 15:00-17:00, at the lobby of the CS Taub Building.

    Research Day events are opportunity for our graduate students to expose their researches using posters and presentations to CS faculty and all degrees students, Technion distinguished representatives and to high-ranking delegates from the hi-tech leading industry companies in Israel and abroad.

    The participating researches will be on various topics: Cryptology and Cyber, Data Centers and Clouds, Graphics, Intelligent Systems and Scientific Computation, Machine Learning and Information Retrieval, Systems and Applications, Testing and Verification, Theory of Computer Science.

    Participating is free but requires preregistration.

    More details and registration

    Students wishing to present their research are kindly requested to register here.

  • Novel Image and Video Super-Resolution Relying on Denoising Algorithms

    Speaker:
    Alon Brifman, M.Sc. Thesis Seminar
    Date:
    Tuesday, 19.6.2018, 11:00
    Place:
    Taub 601
    Advisor:
    Prof. M. Elad

    Single Image Super-Resolution (SISR) aims to recover a high-resolution image from a given low resolution version of it (the given image is assumed to be a blurred, down- sampled and noisy version of the original image). Video Super Resolution (VSR) targets series of given images, aiming to fuse them to create a higher resolution outcome. Although SISR and VSR seem to have a lot in common, as only the input domain changes between the two, most SISR algorithms do not have a simple extension to VSR, apart for the trivial option of applying the SISR for each frame separately. The VSR task is considered to be a more challenging inverse problem, mainly due to its reliance on a sub-pixel accurate motion estimation, which has no parallel in SISR. Another complication is the dynamics of the video, often addressed by simply generating a single frame instead of a complete output sequence. We suggest an appealing alternative to the above that leads to a simple and robust Super-Resolution framework that can be applied to SISR and then easily extended to VSR. Our work relies on the observation that image and video denoising are well-managed and very effectively treated by a variety of methods, many of which not yet effectively adapted to the super-resolution task. We exploit the Plug-and-Play framework and the recently introduced Regularization-by-Denoising (RED) approach that extends it, and show how to use these denoisers in order to handle the SISR and the VSR problems. This way, we benefit from the effectiveness and efficiency of existing image/video denoising algorithms, while solving much more challenging problems. We test our SISR framework against the NCSR algorithm that solves for denoising and super-resolution separately, and show how its denoiser can be used in order to perform highly effective super-resolution. Then we turn to video, harnessing the VBM3D video denoiser, we compare our results to the ones obtained by the DeepSR and 3DSKR algorithms, showing a tendency to a higher-quality output and a much faster processing.

  • Core-sets for Nano-Drones, Provable Big/Deep Data Learning and Rami Levy

    Speaker:
    Dan Feldman - COLLOQUIUM LECTURE
    Date:
    Tuesday, 26.6.2018, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Computer Science Dept., Haifa University
    Host:
    Yuval Filmus

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