Colloquia and Seminars

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Computer Science events calendar in HTTP ICS format for of Google calendars, and for Outlook.

Academic Calendar at Technion site.

Upcoming Colloquia & Seminars

  • CGGC Seminar: Geometric Methods for Realistic Animation of Faces

    Speaker:
    Amit Bermano (Princeton Graphics Group)
    Date:
    Sunday, 30.4.2017, 13:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.

    In this talk, I will briefly introduce myself, mainly focusing on my doctoral dissertation, addressing realistic facial animation.

    Realistic facial synthesis is one of the most fundamental problems in computer graphics, and is desired in a wide variety of fields, such as film and advertising, computer games, teleconferencing, user-interface agents and avatars, and facial surgery planning.

    In the dissertation, we present the most commonly practiced facial content creation process, and contribute to the quality of each of its three steps.

    The proposed algorithms significantly increase the level of realism attained and therefore substantially reduce the amount of manual labor required for production quality facial content.

  • Coding Theory: LDPC Codes over the q-ary Multi-Bit Channel

    Speaker:
    Rami Cohen (CS, Technion)
    Date:
    Sunday, 30.4.2017, 14:30
    Place:
    Taub 601

    The rapid development of memory technologies has introduced challenges to the continued scaling of memory devices in density and access speed. Many of these challenges can be mitigated by coding techniques, which optimize the representation of data within these memories. In this talk, we present a practically-motivated model, where the use of novel coding frameworks improves performance. We start with introducing the class of partial-erasure channels, where the channel output is a set containing the input symbol. We focus on a channel model we term the q-ary multi-bit channel, which models errors with graded levels of severity (common in non-volatile memories). Our results include asymptotic and finite-length iterative-decoding analysis and code design and maximum-likelihood decoding analysis of GF(q) low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes.

  • Distributed construction of graph spanners

    Speaker:
    Ami Paz, Ph.D. Thesis Seminar
    Date:
    Wednesday, 3.5.2017, 12:30
    Place:
    Taub 201
    Advisor:
    Prof. Keren Censor-Hillel

    A spanner of a given graph is a sparse subgraph that approximately preserves distances. Since their introduction in the late 1980's, spanners have found numerous applications in synchronization problems, information dissemination, routing schemes and more. Many applications of spanners are in computer networks, where the network needs to find a spanner for its own communication graph. We present distributed algorithms for constructing additive spanners in networks of bounded message size, namely in the CONGEST model. In addition, we present an innovative technique for showing lower bounds for constructing spanners in this setting, a technique that can be useful for other distributed graph problems. This is a part of my phd work, which concentrates on computing distances in distributed systems. Based on joint works with Keren Censor-Hillel, Telikepalli Kavitha, Noam Ravid and Amir Yehudayoff

  • TCE Workshop: 2017 Stephen and Sharon Seiden Frontiers in Engineering and Science

    TCE Workshop: 2017 Stephen and Sharon Seiden Frontiers in Engineering and Science

    Date:
    Friday, 5.5.2017, 09:30
    Place:
    TCE, TECHNION

    You are invited to the upcoming 2017 Stephen and Sharon Seiden Frontiers in Engineering and Science Workshop. This year, the workshop will be titled "Beyond CMOS: From Devices to Systems" and will be held at the Technion, Haifa, Israel on Monday-Tuesday, June 5-6, 2017.

    This workshop will bring together researchers and leaders from academia and industry to discuss the many different aspects of emerging solid state memories including device physics, circuits, architecture, reliability, security, and systems. These technologies include RRAM, PCM, 3D Xpoint, STT MRAM, CBRAM, memristors, and many others from all of these fields, including executives from industry who will discuss the commercialization aspects of these technologies.

    A call for posters will follow soon, as well as the final program. Registration opens on March 15th, 2017.

    More details will be available on the workshop website.

  • CSpecial Guest: Design by Introspection

    Speaker:
    Andrei Alexandrescu
    Date:
    Tuesday, 9.5.2017, 11:00
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.

    Over the years, a few programming paradigms have been successful enough to enter the casual vocabulary of software engineers: procedural, imperative, object-oriented, functional, generic, declarative. There's a B-list, too, that includes paradigms such as logic, constraint-oriented, and symbolic. The point is, there aren't very many of them altogether. Easy to imagine, then, the immensely humbling pressure one must feel when stumbling upon a way to think about writing code that is at the same time explosively productive and firmly removed from any of the paradigms considered canon. This talk shares early experience with Design by Introspection, a proposed programming paradigm that has enough demonstrable results to be worth sharing. The tenets of Design by Introspection are:

    * The rule of optionality: Component primitives are almost entirely opt-in. A given component is required to implement only a modicum of primitives, and all others are optional. The component is free to implement any subset of the optional primitives.

    * The rule of introspection: A component user employs introspection on the component to implement its own functionality using the primitives offered by the component.

    * The rule of elastic composition: a component obtained by composing several other components offers capabilities in proportion with the capabilities offered by its individual components.

    These rules, and how to use them to build powerful software, are the topic of this talk.

  • Communication-efficient Algorithms for Distributed Stream Mining

    Speaker:
    Moshe Gabel, Ph.D. Thesis Seminar
    Date:
    Wednesday, 10.5.2017, 13:00
    Place:
    Taub 601
    Advisor:
    Prof. A. Schuster, Prof. D. Keren

    Recent years has seen an explosion in the number of connected devices, which means not only growth in velocity and volume of data, but also that data sources are increasingly geographically distributed, raising cost of communication. Data mining algorithms often assume that data is centralized or that communication is inexpensive: the setting is implicitly assumed to be a data center. In settings like wireless sensor networks, however, communication costs battery power. Moreover, most work only considers one-shot computation: computing a result once from a fixed data set. Yet data is increasingly dynamic, and many applications need current results over a recent time window. In this talk, we focus on computing approximations over aggregated distributed data streams with reduced communication. Using a safe zone framework developed in our group (also called geometric monitoring), we'll describe three novel distributed approximations for important non-linear functions: variance, least-squares regression, and Shannon's entropy. Our algorithms provide deterministic user-defined error bounds, while avoiding messages unless needed to maintain those bounds. Compared to the centralized solution, our algorithms reduce communication by up to two orders of magnitude on several real data sets, including machine health monitoring, network monitoring with netflows, traffic monitoring, and others.

  • Quantum computation: A computational lens on quantum physics

    Speaker:
    Dorit Aharonov - COLLOQUIUM LECTURE
    Date:
    Tuesday, 16.5.2017, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Hebrew University, Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering
    Host:
    Yuval Filmus
  • How to find cryptographic needles in exponentially large haystacks

    Speaker:
    Adi Shamir - COLLOQUIUM LECTURE
    Date:
    Tuesday, 6.6.2017, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Weizmann Institute
    Host:
    Yuval Filmus

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  • CRYPTODAY 2017

    CRYPTODAY 2017

    Date:
    Thursday, 15.6.2017, 09:00
    Place:
    CS Taub Auditorium 1

    The 2017 Workshop in Cryptology will be held on Thursday, June 15 2017, between 9:00-17:15, in Auditorium 1, at the CS Taub Building, Technion.

    Most talks will be held in Hebrew and Keynote speaker will be Dr. Marc Stevens who will talk about his recent work that found a collision of SHA-1. Other highlights will be talks about virtual coins and blockchains, and other topics.

    More details and program, including lecture abstracts, (free but required) registration and arrival directions.

    You are all invited!

  • Effective deductive verification of safety of distributed protocols in unbounded systems

    Speaker:
    Mooly Sagiv - COLLOQUIUM LECTURE
    Date:
    Tuesday, 20.6.2017, 14:30
    Place:
    Room 337 Taub Bld.
    Affiliation:
    Tel-Aviv University, School of Computer Science
    Host:
    Yuval Filmus

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